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Over 800 Oxford undergraduate first year students took part in the initial wave of the U-Flourish study. The follow-up study will now ask these same students about their experiences to-date with questions specifically added into the survey about the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on their mental health and aspects of their student experience.

image shows students sat around chatting and having a coffee.

Professor Anne Duffy, the study's principal investigator, said,

 

The COVID-19 pandemic has further highlighted the pressing need to collect reliable data on the mental health and well-being of university students. This information will inform the scope of mental health concerns among students over the course of the pandemic. This is important as it is needed for effective student mental health service development and adaption moving forward.Professor Anne Duffy.

  

The Oxford U-Flourish Student Wellbeing and Academic Success Study aims to understand predictive factors at entry to university, student well-being, and academic outcomes at completion of the first undergraduate academic year.

Students completed electronic surveys sent to their university email asking them about personal, family, lifestyle and psychosocial factors at the beginning of the Michaelmas term in 2019.

The Trinity Term follow-up survey is now 'live' and will be available until 28 May. 

NIHR OXFORD HEALTH BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH CENTRE NEWS

Please follow the link below to read the news on the NIHR BRC website.

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