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Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience, Catherine Harmer, from Oxford University Department of Psychiatry is presenting this year's lecture on 'How do antidepressants work?'.

Professor Catherine Harmer says, 'I'm honoured to be asked to give the Monica Fooks Memorial lecture this year.  I've learnt so much from this lecture series over the years and am very grateful to the Fooks family for enabling this way of increasing awareness and scientific communication about mood disorders.

Date: Friday 6 November, 5-6pm

Venue: University Museum of Natural History, Parks Road, Oxford

See details on Oxford Talks 

To find out more about the origin of the lecture series read here.

NIHR OXFORD HEALTH BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH CENTRE NEWS

Please follow the link below to read the news on the NIHR BRC website.

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