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Background: There is considerable evidence that incidence of schizophrenia and other psychoses varies across ethnic groups in the UK, with particularly high rates for people of African-Caribbean origin. Ai ms: The aims of this shady were to estimate in a community-based sample of people from ethnic minorities: 1) the prevalence of psychotic symptoms; and 2) risk factors for reporting psychotic symptoms. Method: Face-to-face interviews were carried out with a probabilistic sample of 4281 adults from six ethnic groups living in the UK. Psychotic symptoms were measured using the psychosis screening questionnaire (PSQ). Results: There was a twofold higher rate of reporting psychotic symptoms on the PSQ in Black Caribbean people compared with Whites. Adjustment for demographic factors had little effect on this association. Conclusion: Prevalence rates of psychotic symptoms were higher in people from ethnic minorities, but were not consistent with the much higher first contact rates for psychotic disorder reported previously, particularly in Black Caribbeans. © Steinkopff Verlag 2005.

Original publication

DOI

10.1007/s00127-005-0900-7

Type

Journal article

Journal

Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology

Publication Date

01/05/2005

Volume

40

Pages

375 - 381