Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

BACKGROUND: A series of small, mainly uncontrolled, studies have suggested that techniques adapted from cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) for depression can improve outcome in psychosis, but no large randomised controlled trial of intensive treatment for medication-resistant symptoms of psychosis has previously been published. METHOD: Sixty participants who each had at least one positive and distressing symptom of psychosis that was medication-resistant were randomly allocated between a CBT and standard care condition (n = 28) and a standard care only control condition (n = 32). Therapy was individualised, and lasted for nine months. Multiple assessments of outcome were used. RESULTS: Over nine months, improvement was significant only in the treatment group, who showed a 25% reduction on the BPRS. No other clinical, symptomatic or functioning measure changed significantly. Participants had a low drop-out rate from therapy (11%), and expressed high levels of satisfaction with treatment (80%). Fifty per cent of the CBT group were treatment responders (one person became worse), compared with 31% of the control group (three people became worse and another committed suicide). CONCLUSIONS: CBT for psychosis can improve overall symptomatology. The findings provide evidence that even a refractory group of clients with a long history of psychosis can engage in talking about psychotic symptoms and their meaning, and this can improve outcome.

Type

Journal article

Journal

Br J Psychiatry

Publication Date

10/1997

Volume

171

Pages

319 - 327

Keywords

Adaptation, Psychological, Adult, Aged, Cognitive Therapy, Delusions, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Patient Dropouts, Patient Satisfaction, Psychiatric Status Rating Scales, Psychotic Disorders, Treatment Outcome