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Few empirical studies have explored the associations between formal and informal mindfulness home practice and outcome in Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT). In this study ninety-nine participants randomised to MBCT in a multi-centre randomised controlled trial completed self-reported ratings of home practice over 7 treatment weeks. Recurrence of Major Depression was assessed immediately after treatment, and at 3, 6, 9, and 12-months post-treatment. Results identified a significant association between mean daily duration of formal home practice and outcome and additionally indicated that participants who reported that they engaged in formal home practice on at least 3 days a week during the treatment phase were almost half as likely to relapse as those who reported fewer days of formal practice. These associations were independent of the potentially confounding variable of participant-rated treatment plausibility. The current study identified no significant association between informal home practice and outcome, although this may relate to the inherent difficulties in quantifying informal home mindfulness practice. These findings have important implications for clinicians discussing mindfulness-based interventions with their participants, in particular in relation to MBCT, where the amount of participant engagement in home practice appears to have a significant positive impact on outcome.

Original publication

DOI

10.1016/j.brat.2014.08.015

Type

Journal article

Journal

Behav Res Ther

Publication Date

12/2014

Volume

63

Pages

17 - 24

Keywords

Depression, Home practice, Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy, Recurrence, Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Cognitive Therapy, Depressive Disorder, Major, Female, Humans, Male, Meditation, Middle Aged, Mindfulness, Recurrence, Secondary Prevention, Treatment Outcome, Young Adult