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The acclaimed Switching Perceptions exhibition, showing artwork and concepts which were created in collaboration with people experiencing psychosis, will be on show at the Barbican.

From Segment of aself, artwork © Eleanor Minney, 2018

From 12 to 20 October 2019 in the Life Rewired Hub at the Barbican, a series of events, workshops and talks that consider whether an understanding of our genes could lead to a better understanding of mental illness will take place.

Created by artist Eleanor Minney and Associate Professor Liz Tunbridge, Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, in collaboration with patients from the National Psychosis Unit at the Bethlem Royal Hospital, the project will allow visitors to explore perspectives on the mind, brain, subjective experience and the genetic and biological components of psychiatric illness.

For further event information visit Barbican.

The original exhibition took place at the Bethlem Gallery from Jan-March 2019.

Winner of the Vice-Chancellor's Public Engagement Award - engaging through art in psychiatric illnesses.

Read more in The Conversation - How the power of art can help scientists like me understand the experience of schizophrenia.

NIHR OXFORD HEALTH BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH CENTRE NEWS

Please follow the link below to read the news on the NIHR BRC website.

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