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This NEW Oxford Short Course in Experimental Medicine for Mental Health (OxCEMM) offers a thorough grounding in the practicalities of running an experimental medicine study through talks, tours of facilities and round table discussions with senior researchers.

Image shows group of participants sat down, listening to a speaker at the front of the room leading the course.

This first NIHR Oxford Health Biomedical Research Centre’s course on experimental medicine was a great success. Welcoming an engaged group of people, attendees hailed from a wide range of backgrounds, including clinical and non-clinical academics, nurses and allied health professionals.

 

We are thrilled with how well-received OxCEMM 2019 was. The participants were engaged and enthusiastic, and said that they really benefited from the course. Even those who were already running experimental medicine studies said how much they had learnt and how useful it was to have all the practical information that they need in a single place. Associate Professor Liz Tunbridge

 

Associate Professor Liz Tunbridge, Training Lead for the NIHR Oxford Health Biomedical Research Centre, said, "I am extremely grateful to my colleagues for their help and support in making OxCEMM 2019 such a huge success, and look forward to building on our experiences this year to develop future courses and networks."

 

Feedback from attendees was uniformly excellent, with a clear call to run OxCEMM on an annual basis and to establish an Experimental Medicine Network in the coming months. This will provide a platform for those interested in experimental medicine to engage with others in the field in order to share ideas, pose questions and engage in topical discussions.

 

 

An intellectually stimulating course filled with inspirational content and pragmatic advice...comprehensive range of topics and speakers...useful to have access to experts who were all very approachable and friendly
Quotes from participants

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  


For more information, to register your interest in the Experimental Medicine Network or to request an alert when applications open for OxCEMM January 2020, please contact oxcemm@psych.ox.ac.uk.

NIHR OXFORD HEALTH BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH CENTRE NEWS

Please follow the link below to read the news on the NIHR BRC website.

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