Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

A new summary report, What science has shown can help young people with anxiety and depression - Identifying and reviewing the 'active ingredients' of effective interventions, from Wellcome has been published. It includes new research from Oxford University, which investigates the knowns and unknowns of SSRI treatment (antidepressant drugs) in young people with depression and anxiety.

A self-portrait of Hayleigh in her mum’s bedroom. May 2020. © Hayleigh Longman / COVID-19 Anxiety Project © Wellcome Trust

This summary report looks at approaches like relaxation techniques, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), sleep and helpful thinking patterns as part of the different mental health treatments and approaches currently available.

Professor Catherine Harmer, study author, Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, said:

 

'Clinical trials show that SSRIs (antidepressants) can help treat anxiety and depression in young people, but they aren’t a solution for everyone. We need to start again when it comes to developing new treatments for young people and we need more research on how treatments work in this age group and how we can make them work better.' 

This publication is released alongside Insights from the Wellcome Global Monitor, a new global survey looking into people's experiences and views on mental health and science. The Global Monitor report highlights that over nine in ten people worldwide (92%) feel mental health is as or more important than physical health for overall wellbeing, with almost half (46%) saying it is more important.

Despite the high value people put on mental health, the survey found that science’s role in understanding and alleviating mental health issues seems unclear to many. Less than a third said science can explain a lot about how feelings and emotions work (27%) or can do a lot to help treat anxiety or depression (31%). In contrast, about half said science can do a lot to help treat infectious diseases (53%) or cancer (49%).  

Professor Miranda Wolpert, Director of Mental Health at Wellcome, said: 

 

'It’s clear that people around the world really value mental health but they don’t see science’s role in improving it. This is perhaps not that surprising, when we still know so little about what works for whom, and why. Science has enormous potential to improve mental health and researchers across the world are working to deepen our understanding and develop new treatment approaches. It might not be easy, but it’s within our grasp. Now is the time to go further and faster to find solutions to the problems faced by all of us.'

Read the full news story and the Wellcome Global Monitor Mental Health report

 

NIHR OXFORD HEALTH BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH CENTRE NEWS

Please follow the link below to read the news on the NIHR BRC website.

Similar stories

Mindfulness for Teachers - "Finding Peace in a Frantic World"

A new research study involving more than 200 teachers from across the UK investigated how their experiences and levels of stress, mental health and burn out were impacted by either taught or self-taught mindfulness training.

New Research Highlights Importance of Early Years Development on Future Wellbeing

Oxford researchers involved nearly 4,000 children across the UK in three specially developed science lessons to educate pupils about brain development during early childhood. The SEEN (Secondary Education around Early Neurodevelopment) project was commissioned and funded by KindredSquared and is part of a wider drive to increase public understanding of how early experiences can shape the adults we become.

2021 Most Highly Cited Researchers

Four researchers in the Department of Psychiatry are in the Highly Cited Researcher 2021 list.

Oxfordshire Young People Involved in Childline Research Project

New research conducted by the Neuroscience, Ethics and Society group and NeurOX Young People’s Advisory Group in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Oxford, and the NSPCC, has looked at how Childline’s message boards help support young people.

28th British Isles Research Workshop on Suicide and Self-Harm & Lancet Psychiatry Suicide Symposium

This year's annual meeting focused again on research related to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on suicide and self-harm. There was another session on online safety in the context of suicidal behaviour and the Online Safety Bill. Organised by the Centre for Suicide Research, University of Oxford, these virtual workshops for both senior and early career researchers from the UK and Ireland provide an important opportunity to share knowledge and discuss the latest research. This year there were also contributions from Australia and Denmark.

Experimental Medicine and Industry Partnership

The recent launch event of the Experimental Medicine Industry Partnership was an exciting collaboration between industry representatives and researchers from the University of Oxford. During the event, a series of workshops were held to discuss opportunities, challenges, and future directions for the application of experimental medicine in psychiatric drug development.