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Background: Very recent acts of terrorism in the UK were perpetrated by 'homegrown', well educated young people, rather than by foreign Islamist groups; consequently, a process of violent radicalization was proposed to explain how ordinary people were recruited and persuaded to sacrifice their lives.Discussion: Counterterrorism approaches grounded in the criminal justice system have not prevented violent radicalization. Indeed there is some evidence that these approaches may have encouraged membership of radical groups by not recognizing Muslim communities as allies, citizens, victims of terrorism, and victims of discrimination, but only as suspect communities who were then further alienated. Informed by public health research and practice, a new approach is proposed to target populations vulnerable to recruitment, rather than rely only on research of well known terrorist groups and individual perpetrators of terrorist acts.Conclusions: This paper proposes public health research and practice to guard against violent radicalization. © 2012 Bhui et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

Original publication

DOI

10.1186/1741-7015-10-16

Type

Journal article

Journal

BMC Medicine

Publication Date

14/02/2012

Volume

10