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Previous research on assessment of mindfulness by self-report suggests that it may include five component skills: observing, describing, acting with awareness, nonjudging of inner experience, and nonreactivity to inner experience. These elements of mindfulness can be measured with the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ). The authors investigated several aspects of the construct validity of the FFMQ in experienced meditators and nonmeditating comparison groups. Consistent with predictions, most mindfulness facets were significantly related to meditation experience and to psychological symptoms and well-being. As expected, relationships between the observing facet and psychological adjustment varied with meditation experience. Regression and mediation analyses showed that several of the facets contributed independently to the prediction of well-being and significantly mediated the relationship between meditation experience and well-being. Findings support the construct validity of the FFMQ in a combination of samples not previously investigated.

Original publication

DOI

10.1177/1073191107313003

Type

Journal article

Journal

Assessment

Publication Date

09/2008

Volume

15

Pages

329 - 342

Keywords

Adaptation, Psychological, Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Female, Humans, Male, Meditation, Mental Disorders, Mental Health, Middle Aged, Mind-Body Relations, Metaphysical, Psychometrics, Regression Analysis, Self-Assessment, Surveys and Questionnaires, Young Adult