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OBJECTIVE: This study investigated whether there is a bias against eating disorders research among the leading psychiatric, psychological, and medical journals. METHOD: The authors performed a comparison between the number of empirical articles published about anorexia nervosa and/or bulimia nervosa and the number of articles published about panic disorder and/or agoraphobia (i.e., disorders of comparable disease burden) in 29 high-impact journals over a 5-year period (1996-2001). RESULTS: There were almost twice as many published empirical articles about panic disorder and/or agoraphobia (N=365) as there were about anorexia nervosa and/or bulimia nervosa (N=169). CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate a possible bias against eating disorders research among some leading psychiatric journals. Alternative explanations and implications are discussed.

Original publication

DOI

10.1176/appi.ajp.160.2.363

Type

Journal article

Journal

Am J Psychiatry

Publication Date

02/2003

Volume

160

Pages

363 - 365

Keywords

Biomedical and Behavioral Research, Empirical Approach, Agoraphobia, Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia, Feeding and Eating Disorders, Humans, Panic Disorder, Periodicals as Topic, Publication Bias, Publishing, Quality-Adjusted Life Years