Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Dr Simona Skripkauskaite, Departments of Psychiatry and Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, is the UK lead for one of the ten collaborative research projects jointly awarded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS), to address the challenges presented by the global pandemic.

GB flag with Japan flag

Dr Simona Skripkauskaite, said,

 

'We're extremely grateful to the ESRC and the JSPS for supporting our research. This funding will allow us to investigate how children, young people, and parents are doing now, two years since the first UK national lockdown, and to assess who may not be "bouncing back" over the longer term. 

'Conducting this research in collaboration with our colleagues in the National Center for Child Health and Development in Japan will allow us to assess how experiences have varied across both countries, which have distinct approaches to the pandemic. This research builds on our Co-SPACE study, which we began during the first lockdown. We hope to use what we learn from this new research to help empower young people themselves to be able to translate and share important research findings with wider audiences, by designing guidelines for policy makers and practitioners.'

 

Project: Learning from the trajectories of mental health challenges for children, young people and parents across Japan and the UK over the course of COVID-19. 

COVID-19 and the related public health measures have led to major disruptions to families' lives, with different pressures arising for children, young people, and their families over time. Together with young people and families, the project aims to co-design guidelines for policymakers and health authorities which will:

  • Mitigate identified mental health consequences of the pandemic and current policies
  • Tailor future pandemic management strategies to minimise mental health impacts

Read more information about this project and the other projects awarded.

Read more about COVID-19: Supporting Parents, Adolescents and Children during Epidemics (Co-SPACE) study, which was set up to help understand how families have coped throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, and what parents can do to support their children's mental health.

NIHR OXFORD HEALTH BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH CENTRE NEWS

Please follow the link below to read the news on the NIHR BRC website.

Similar stories

New study shows higher rate of fractures in people with intellectual disability

In the most comprehensive study of its kind, researchers at the University of Oxford and Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust found a substantially higher rate of fractures in people with intellectual disability compared with people of the same age and gender without an intellectual disability

Engagement with arts and culture can have a positive impact on mental health in young people

A new study finds that engaging with arts and culture online can improve mental health in young people.

Increased Risk of Some Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders Remains 2 Years After COVID-19 Infection

New study from the University of Oxford and the National Institute for Health and Care Research (NIHR) Oxford Health Biomedical Research Centre investigated neurological and psychiatric diagnoses in over 1.25 million people following diagnosed COVID-19 infection, using data from the US-based TriNetX electronic health record network.

Tackling Suicide Risk in People With Mental Disorders

Clinical researchers from Oxford University’s Department of Psychiatry and Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust, together with colleagues from elsewhere, have developed guidance to help clinicians identify and treat patients at risk of suicide.