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We explore how the brain processes emotional information and how this is influenced by brain chemicals and medicines. This helps us to understand disorders such as depression and anxiety and to understand and contribute to the development of drug and psychological treatments.

Perl group 2

The Psychopharmacology and Emotion Research Laboratory explores the ways in which the brain processes emotional information and how this is affected by neurotransmitters such as serotonin, noradrenaline and dopamine. As well as telling us about normal brain function, this may help us understand emotional disorders such as depression and anxiety and how these may be helped by drug treatments that affect neurotransmitter function. We attempt to understand how conventional treatments may work, how mechanisms underlying treatment efficacy interact with psychological treatments, and also whether we can predict new candidate treatments for depression and anxiety using these experimental medicine models.

Potentially paradigm-changing findingsM.E. Thase, American Journal of Psychiatry

The group comprises a multidisciplinary team of psychiatrists, psychologists, pharmacologists and neuroscientists and aims to explore these questions using human models of cognitive and emotional processing. Our methodologies include psychopharmacological challenges, neuropsychological testing, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and functional neuroimaging with fMRI, MEG and PET in healthy volunteers, patient and at-risk groups.

A major output of the group has been the development of a human model of antidepressant drug action (the Cognitive Neuropsychological Model; Harmer et al., 2009, British Journal of Psychiatry), based on the results of a series of studies which showed that antidepressant drugs bias emotional processing towards positive information much earlier than antidepressant effects on mood can be detected. Such changes are believed to contribute to the recovery from depression with the delay in antidepressants’ clinical efficacy arising from the need to translate the changes in emotional processing into subjective improvement in mood through interactions with the environment and the gradual relearning of non-depressive, emotional associations.

Our team

Selected publications

PERL News

Members of PERL were at the Headington Festival this weekend.  Our stand had lots of interest and we had good fun  telling local people about our research and handing out smiley face balloons.

Members of PERL were at the Headington Festival ...

We welcome Andrea Enriquez, a visiting summer student from the States

We welcome Andrea Enriquez, a visiting summer ...

Biological Psychiatry in New York City 2018 was a fantastic conference.  Oxford Psychiatry researchers were out in force, with a great session on mood instability chaired by Paul Harrison, and a computational psychiatry workshop organised by Mike Browning.  Susannah Murphy was presenting recent data from our lab on the 5-HT4 agonist prucalopride.

Biological Psychiatry in New York City 2018 was a ...

Quite a few of the lab recently attended The Brain Conference on "New Insights into Psychiatric Disorders through Computational, Biological and Developmental Approaches", which was organised by FENS and held in Copenhagen 25-28 September 2016.

Quite a few of the lab recently attended The ...

Current studies

Healthy volunteers needed for emotional ...

Looking for people who are currently on ...

We are looking for people who are experiencing ...

Healthy volunteers aged 18-40 needed!

We are looking for volunteers for a mental ...

FEELING A BIT DOWN? FEELING PERFECTLY FINE?

Do you suffer from panic attacks?

ARE SPIDERS A PROBLEM FOR YOU?

EBSELEN AS AN ADD-ON TREATMENT IN HYPO/MANIA

Related research themes