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BACKGROUND: Police officers are frequently the first responders to individuals in crisis, but generally receive little training for this role. We developed and evaluated training in suicide awareness and prevention for frontline rail police in the UK. AIMS: To investigate the impact of training on officers' suicide prevention attitudes, confidence, and knowledge. METHOD: Fifty-three participants completed a brief questionnaire before and after undertaking training. In addition, two focus groups were conducted with 10 officers to explore in greater depth their views and experiences of the training program and the perceived impact on practice. RESULTS: Baseline levels of suicide prevention attitudes, confidence, and knowledge were mixed but mostly positive and improved significantly after training. Such improvements were seemingly maintained over time, but there was insufficient power to test this statistically. Feedback on the course was generally excellent, notwithstanding some criticisms and suggestions for improvement. CONCLUSION: Training in suicide prevention appears to have been well received and to have had a beneficial impact on officers' attitudes, confidence, and knowledge. Further research is needed to assess its longer-term effects on police attitudes, skills, and interactions with suicidal individuals, and to establish its relative effectiveness in the context of multilevel interventions.

Original publication

DOI

10.1027/0227-5910/a000381

Type

Journal article

Journal

Crisis

Publication Date

05/2016

Volume

37

Pages

194 - 204

Keywords

gatekeeper, intervention, police, suicide, training