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In partnership with members from the Department of Psychiatry this new study investigating the experiences of end-of-life care during the pandemic, now includes specific questions about communication with friends and relatives about their loved ones' illness and death.

Pebbles on a beach and sea water.

The COVID-19 crisis has affected many people in the UK. Social distancing restrictions have affected healthcare delivery, with significant changes to the way patients are cared for, both in hospital and in the community. These include individuals being cared for at the end of their life.

Drs Louise Dalton and Elizabeth Rapa, Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, said,

"The team has developed an online questionnaire to enable people to share their experiences of end-of-life care provision during the COVID-19 crisis. This will enable learning from what worked well or what was more difficult, which will help to inform planning and management of situations like this in the future."

The study is conducted by the Palliative Care Institute Liverpool at the University of Liverpool in collaboration with the University of Sheffield. The survey asks people to provide information on their experiences of a patient, resident, friend or family members’ end-of-life-care during the COVID-19 crisis.

Who can take part in this survey?

  • Anyone who has experienced the death of a relative or friend
  • Any health and social care professionals who have cared for a patient who died during the COVID-19 crisis

The person who died may or may not have been infected with COVID-19. 

To see the survey

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