Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

A project led by Professor Kam Bhui and Dr Roisin Mooney, University of Oxford, will focus on reducing the number of people admitted or readmitted to compulsory care under the Mental Health Act. This is one of four new research projects funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) with the aim to improve patient experiences and outcomes under the Mental Health Act.

doctor and patient consultation

The £3 million new research projects aim to reduce the number of compulsory hospital admissions for people with mental health conditions and improve the experiences of patients and their families and friends.

The research, funded by the NIHR Policy Research Programme, will support the government’s newly announced reforms of the Mental Health Act and provide evidence to policy makers rolling out the reforms.

The Mental Health Act (1983) covers the assessment, treatment and rights of people with a mental health disorder. Under this act a person can be detained, or ‘sectioned’, and treated without their agreement if they are at risk of harm to themselves or others.

Since the act came into force, the rates of compulsory detentions in mental health hospitals have more than doubled. Black British people are over four times more likely than white British people to be detained under that legislation.

Following an independent review of the Mental Health Act in 2018, the government has launched landmark reforms of mental health laws to deliver parity between mental and physical health services, put patients’ views at the centre of their care, and tackle the disproportionate detention of people from black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) communities.

Professor Kamaldeep Bhui and Dr Roisin Mooney at the University of Oxford will invite service users and mental health staff to use photography to capture their experiences of compulsory admission, which will then be used to inform a new approach to reducing the number of people receiving compulsory care.

Professor Bhui and Dr Mooney said,

“We are so delighted to be leading this important creative and experience-driven policy research to improve the care of people with mental health problems, especially if they receive care under the powers of the Mental Health Act. We know this disproportionately affects some ethnic groups and anticipate the research will provide a strong evidence base - grounded in people’s experience - for therapeutic and policy advances.” 

Funded project summary

Experience based investigation and Co-design of approaches to Prevent and reduce Mental Health Act Use: (CO-PACT)

Professor Kamaldeep Bhui and Dr Roisin Mooney, University of Oxford

This research will recruit service users who have experienced at least one compulsory admission to hospital in the previous year, and mental health staff, from seven cities across England. These participants will be invited to use photography, along with titles, captions, or descriptions, to capture their experiences of compulsory admission.

In each city, this information will be shared among a group of service users, carers and mental health staff, who will work together to design and test a new approach to reduce the number of people receiving compulsory care and ethnic inequalities in the use of the Mental Health Act.

Read more about the other projects funded.

 

 

 

NIHR OXFORD HEALTH BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH CENTRE NEWS

Please follow the link below to read the news on the NIHR BRC website.

Similar stories

How Mindfulness May Improve Body Satisfaction and Mood

New research from Emma Osborne, Research Assistant at the Centre for Research on Eating Disorders (CREDO) at the University of Oxford (and PhD Candidate at the University of Bath), and Dr Melissa Atkinson, University of Bath, investigated two ways in which mindfulness might improve body satisfaction and mood.

Review Highlights Risk Factors Associated with Violence in Schizophrenia

Researchers at Oxford University’s Department of Psychiatry have found that people with schizophrenia and related disorders are at higher-than-average risk of perpetrating violence, but that the overall risk remains low (less than 1 in 20 in women, and less than 1 in 4 for men over a 35-year period for violent arrests and crimes).

New Study will Investigate Brain Fog Symptoms in Post-Hospitalised COVID-19 Patients

C-Fog is a collaborative new study led by Oxford University researcher, Dr Maxime Taquet, which will investigate the reasons why brain fog or cognition problems affect patients after COVID-19 infection. With a better understanding of the mechanisms involved it may be possible to understand how to treat brain fog and help many thousands of people worldwide.

A New Experimental Study Investigated the Effects of Atorvastatin on Emotional Processing

Atorvastatin is one of a group of statins widely used to treat heart and blood vessel diseases. The medication works by lowering cholesterol in the blood. This new study shows that atorvastatin influences the way people experience certain emotions, giving us important insights about disorders such as anxiety and depression.

People with Long-COVID After Hospitalisation Face Limited Recovery After One Year

People who were hospitalised with COVID-19 and continued to experience symptoms five months later, show limited further recovery one year after hospital discharge, according to the latest results of a major national study looking at the long-term health impacts of COVID-19 on hospitalised patients.

The Effects of Social Media on Public Attention and Attitudes Towards COVID-19 Vaccines in the UK

A new study finds that media coverage of positive vaccine research can have a positive effect on overall social media sentiment, countering vaccine misinformation, but the effects wane over time.