Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

The University of Oxford and Sound Pharmaceuticals completed this new Phase 2a study testing SPI-1005, an investigational drug that contains ebselen, as a new treatment for bipolar disorder.

Trees in the shape of two heads, one with green leaves in blue sky and the other with empty branches in grey sky.

Professor Phil Cowen, Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, said,

“This work was done in collaboration with colleagues from the Department of Pharmacology at the University of Oxford who discovered that a drug called ebselen had pharmacological properties similar to those of the mood-stabilising drug, lithium. Lithium is a very useful agent in bipolar disorder but is not well-tolerated and requires regular blood tests. Ebselen would be free from these problems.

"The study shows important preliminary evidence of therapeutic activity for SPI-1005 in bipolar disorder. This pilot investigation has given us critical information to inform design of future trials and has confirmed the safety of SPI-1005 in a group of patients with severe mental illness taking multiple medications.” 

The study was funded by the Stanley Medical Research Institute and the medication was supplied by Sound Pharmaceuticals.

To read the full press release

To read the full study, A phase 2a randomised, double-blind, plcebo-controlled, parallel-group, add-on clinical trial of ebselen (SPI-1005) as a novel treatment for mania or hypomania.

NIHR OXFORD HEALTH BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH CENTRE NEWS

Please follow the link below to read the news on the NIHR BRC website.

Similar stories

Helping People with Psychosis Feel Less Distressed May Help Reduce the Risk of Self-harm

New research shows that by lessening the severity and impact of persecutory symptoms of psychosis, it may be possible to reduce the likelihood of someone with psychosis having thoughts of suicide or harming themselves.

Ground-breaking Treatment Offers New Hope for Patients with Persecutory Delusions

Feeling Safe is a new treatment programme for persecutory delusions, which promises a step change in the treatment of severe mental health problems.

Depressive Symptoms and Risky Behaviours Among Adolescents in Low-and Middle-Income Countries

New meta-analysis, published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, shows adolescents with depressive symptoms were more likely to engage in risky behaviours compared with non-depressed adolescents.

Adolescent Mental Health and Development in the Digital World

A new project has been awarded funding from the UKRI £24 million investment into improving the mental health and wellbeing of adolescents in the UK.

£24m Investment into Adolescent Mental Health to Enable Young People to Flourish

UKRI have announced a major £24 million investment into improving the mental health and wellbeing of adolescents in the UK. One of the projects being funded is led by Professor Kam Bhui in the Department of Psychiatry, it will bring together diverse creative-arts, digital and health experts to investigate how adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) can affect adolescents' mental health.

£36 Million Boost for AI Technologies to Revolutionise NHS Care

An Oxford project using artificial intelligence to develop digital triage tools for mental health clinicians (CHRONOS) is one of 38 projects supported by the second wave of the NHS AI Lab's AI in Health and Care Award.