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Professor John Geddes, WA Handley-elect Chair of Psychiatry, is one of the thirty-three University of Oxford researchers, which have been named Turing Fellows for the 2021/22 academic year.

Computer generated Image of Alan Turing

The University’s cohort of fellows comprises researchers from 14 departments spanning the Mathematical, Physical, and Life Sciences (MPLS), Social Sciences and Medical Sciences divisions. Some have been closely involved with the Alan Turing Institute – the UK’s national institute for data science and AI – since its creation in 2015, when Oxford was one of the five founding university members; for the rest, the Fellowship is their first formal association with the Institute.

Fellows’ research interests range from the fundamentals of AI and development of novel methods to cutting-edge application of data science to real-world challenges in areas from seismology and volcanology to immunology, neuroscience, mental healthcare, and finance.

Professor John Geddes, said:

'The Alan Turing Institute is the UK’s premier centre for data science and artificial intelligence. The Fellowship – and the Turing’s convening power -  will provide an excellent platform for me to maximise the potential of the Institute’s expertise in data science for mental health research.  I’m delighted to be named a Turing Fellow - and I am greatly looking forward to engaging with a community replete with expertise in all data science disciplines and the Institute's academic activities.'

Read the full list of fellows from the University of Oxford.

NIHR OXFORD HEALTH BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH CENTRE NEWS

Please follow the link below to read the news on the NIHR BRC website.

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