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Find out how virtual reality (VR) is used in research to help build confidence and reduce stress in young people. Visit Julia Badger, Lucy Bowes and Aitor Rovira at their IF Festival stand on 28 October between 11 am and 4 pm. Put on a headset, test your reactions and see how your body responds.

VR scenario by Aitor Rovira

The oRANGE Lab (Oxford Risk and Resilience, Genes and Environment Research) in the Department of Experimental Psychology focuses research work on the development and onset of mental health problems and on understanding trajectories of risk and resilience over the life course. The research aims to use innovative technologies to better explore the factors associated to the onset of mental health issues in adolescents, such as anxiety and depression.

For many years data was collected using self-report methods which could lead to inaccuracies and confounds. By using VR technologies and wristwatches that track physiological reactions such as galvanic skin response (GSR; the changes in electrical resistance of the skin caused by emotional stress), the group aim to explore the psychological and physiological reactions, and factors associated, to social interactions in a safe and tightly-controlled, yet highly realistic way.

Exhibiting at the IF Oxford Science and Ideas Festival on 28 October, Blackbird Leys Community Centre, Blackbird Leys Road, OX4 6HW, the team will give visitors the opportunity to try out these new technologies, people will be able to see and understand the significance and application of these technologies in important research projects.

 

We're excited to give the public a chance to learn more about VR, new technologies and the benefit these have on research. Our focus on mental health issues in adolescents is so important, with the ever increasing pressures that young people face today. We hope people will stop by and visit us to find out more.
- Team working in the oRANGE Lab.

 

For more information visit IF Oxford Science and Ideas Festival 2019.

The team works closely with the Department of Psychiatry and Professor Daniel Freeman on this project researching wellbeing and mental health.

 

NIHR OXFORD HEALTH BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH CENTRE NEWS

Please follow the link below to read the news on the NIHR BRC website.

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