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BACKGROUND: Some personality characteristics have previously been associated with an increased risk for psychiatric disorder. Longitudinal studies are required in order to tease apart temporary (state) and enduring (trait) differences in personality among individuals with bipolar disorder (BD). This study aimed to determine whether there is a characteristic personality profile in BD, and whether associations between BD and personality are best explained by state or trait effects. METHOD: A total of 2247 participants in the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder study completed the NEO Five-Factor Inventory administered at study entry, and at 1 and 2 years. RESULTS: Personality in BD was characterized by high neuroticism (N) and openness (O), and low agreeableness (A), conscientiousness (C) and extraversion (E). This profile was replicated in two independent samples, and openness was found to distinguish BD from major depressive disorder. Latent growth modeling demonstrated that manic symptoms were associated with increased E and decreased A, and depressed symptoms with higher N and lower E, A, C and O. During euthymic phases, high N and low E scores predicted a future depression-prone course. CONCLUSIONS: While there are clear state effects of mood on self-reported personality, personality variables during euthymia predict future course of illness. Personality disturbances in extraversion, neuroticism and openness may be enduring characteristics of patients with BD.

Original publication

DOI

10.1017/S0033291710002333

Type

Journal article

Journal

Psychol Med

Publication Date

08/2011

Volume

41

Pages

1593 - 1604

Keywords

Adult, Affect, Bipolar Disorder, Disease Progression, Extraversion (Psychology), Female, Humans, Likelihood Functions, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Personality, Personality Assessment, Personality Inventory