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The recent launch event of the Experimental Medicine Industry Partnership was an exciting collaboration between industry representatives and researchers from the University of Oxford. During the event, a series of workshops were held to discuss opportunities, challenges, and future directions for the application of experimental medicine in psychiatric drug development.

Business Unity and connection partnership as ropes shaped as a circle in a group of diverse strings connected together shaped as a support symbol expressing the feeling of teamwork and togetherness.

Dr Susannah Murphy, Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, explains:

 

'The Experimental Medicine Industry Partnership (EMIP) is a fantastic opportunity for industry partners and researchers to work together to share expertise and maximise opportunities for developing improved psychiatric treatments. By offering tailored peer review and advice the EMIP will help to rapidly progress new treatments into clinical trials, bringing potential new, life changing treatments a step closer to improving the lives of patients.'

Professor Catherine Harmer, Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, said:

 

'It was fascinating to hear pressing questions from an industry perspective and to take part in discussions with other academics. The conversations have spearheaded many collaborations and have inspired us to develop our models in ways that can also work for industry and their requirements. I look forward to continued and future collaborations.'

50 representatives from 15 industry partners and 90 Oxford researchers with expertise in cognitive neuroscience, pharmacology treatment, lifestyle interventions, gut health and precision psychiatry, took part in the AIMday event in July 2021, . 

Read more about this and other topics discussed during the event

For more information about the Experimental Medicine and Industry Partnership (EMIP) 

An Academic Industry Meeting Day (AIMday) is an innovative networking event that allows organisations external to the University of Oxford to set the agenda and gain academic perspective on industry challenges. 

The event was developed through the National Institute for Health Research Oxford Health Biomedical Research Centre (a partnership between the University of Oxford and the Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust).

NIHR OXFORD HEALTH BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH CENTRE NEWS

Please follow the link below to read the news on the NIHR BRC website.

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