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Work was cited as the most frequent source of stress for parents, followed by their children's wellbeing and education, in a new interim report from 5,000 responses to the Co-SPACE (COVID-19 Supporting Parents, Adolescents, and Children in Epidemics) survey led by experts at the University of Oxford.

The interim report indicates some important concerns for parents, employers and health professionals. 

Families with children who have special education needs and neurodevelopmental disorders report even higher levels of stress across all areas. 80 per cent of families who were previously receiving support from social services say it's been stopped or postponed, leaving them with further challenges. 

 

This study is so important to understand the experiences of families currently and how this crisis is impacting on them, but also so we can know how best to support families going forward.  - Professor Cathy Creswell, Departments of Psychiatry and Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford.

 

Professor Cathy Creswell said, 'Our results are showing some hotspots of concern, particularly for parents of children with special education needs and neurodevelopmental disorders. These parents report increased stress across all areas, including managing their children's behaviour, they also express a desire for personalised support from professionals. 

Read the full story.

To complete the survey, visit the Co-SPACE website.

NIHR OXFORD HEALTH BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH CENTRE NEWS

Please follow the link below to read the news on the NIHR BRC website.

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