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Researchers from the NIHR Oxford Health Biomedical Research Centre (a partnership between the University of Oxford and the Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust), like many others across the country, are responding to the call to support frontline NHS services and meet the challenge of COVID-19.

Image shows a COVID-19 molecules.

Many team members are prioritising their clinical work, returning to patient facing roles, or offering their laboratory skills to support COVID-19 testing. This is in accordance with the latest NIHR guidance.

As a consequence research studies may be paused or delayed to enable researchers to prioritise clinical work. Other projects have been put on hold temporarily due to public health considerations. 

BRC staff are now working from home and conducting meetings remotely. The NIHR Oxford Health BRC programme of upcoming events has been postponed or cancelled – for further details relating to specific events please visit the training and events page.

 

As a BRC focused on mental health research we recognise that the current situation is causing significant worry and anxiety throughout the population. We are collaborating with colleagues across the University of Oxford and Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust to make resources available to support people during this difficult time.Professor John Geddes, Director, NIHR Oxford Health BRC.

 

Useful resources:

 

The University of Oxford is at the forefront of research into developing a vaccine for the coronavirus and unprecedented speed, scope and ambition is required.

Read about the COVID-19 research.

Find out more about contributions donations and support.

The NIHR has published a Q&A on the impact of COVID-19 on research which is being updated as the situation develops.

NIHR OXFORD HEALTH BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH CENTRE NEWS

Please follow the link below to read the news on the NIHR BRC website.

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