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A new national survey evaluation - The Social and Psychological Impact of COVID-19 on Medical Students (SPICE-19) - is a multicentre prospective cohort study that will systematically explore the impact of the crisis on medical students at two time points during 2020.

Image shows an array of food spices including garlic, cinnamon, thyme, paprika and turmeric.

The data gathered from this new study (SPICE-19) will not only guide current strategy, resource allocation and wellbeing support within medical schools and foundation training, but may also inform policy for future pandemics and epidemics.

 

Medical students have faced an enormous disruption to their lives and studies as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Many are volunteering in the NHS, and those in their final years have foregone electives and graduated early in order to take up interim foundation doctor roles. These are unprecedented times for all in the medical profession but the impact on students is likely to be particularly significant.Associate Professor Kate Saunders, Department of Psychiatry.

  

For some this crisis may bring them a greater sense of purpose and reaffirm their commitment to the medicine, while others may have much more negative experiences. At present we can only speculate what the effects on mental health and wellbeing in this cohort of students might be. If we are to support these medical students appropriately in the future it is imperative that we understand what they are experiencing and how this might impact upon them, their work and home life, general wellbeing and their subsequent career choices.

Follow on twitter @SPICE_COVID.

The first phase of this study will take place between 4 May to 1 June 2020.

NIHR OXFORD HEALTH BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH CENTRE NEWS

Please follow the link below to read the news on the NIHR BRC website.

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