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OBJECTIVE: To investigate differences in prevalence of mood elevation, distress and depression among first-year undergraduates at Oxford and Stanford universities. METHOD: An online survey was sent to Oxford and Stanford first-year undergraduate students for two consecutive years in the winter of 2005 and 2006. Students completed a survey that assessed mood symptoms and medication use. RESULTS: Both universities had similar rates of distress by General Health Questionnaire (Oxford - 42.4%; Stanford - 38.3%), depression by Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders (Oxford - 6.2%; Stanford - 6.6%), and psychotropic and non-psychotropic medication usage (psychotropic: Oxford - 1.5%; Stanford 3.5%; nonpsychotropic: Oxford - 13.3%; Stanford - 18%). Oxford had higher rates of mood elevation by Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) (Oxford - 4%; Stanford - 1.7%). CONCLUSION: Oxford and Stanford students have similar rates of mood distress, depression and general medication usage. Students at Oxford have a higher prevalence of MDQ scores that possibly indicate a bipolar disorder, while Stanford students are prescribed more psychotropics.

Type

Journal article

Journal

Acta Psychiatr Scand

Publication Date

07/2008

Volume

118

Pages

81 - 85

Keywords

Adolescent, Adult, Anxiety Disorders, Bipolar Disorder, California, Cross-Cultural Comparison, Cross-Sectional Studies, Depressive Disorder, Major, Drug Utilization, England, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Health Surveys, Humans, Internet, Male, Mass Screening, Personality Inventory, Psychometrics, Psychotropic Drugs, Students, Universities