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All Oxford students are invited to take part in the U-Flourish survey from 22 October 2020. The aim of the project is to better understand the factors that contribute to student wellbeing, mental health, and academic success, particularly how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected students and their learning.

Student sitting on the floor with a laptop and doing work, view from above.

Visiting Professor Anne Duffy, Department of Psychiatry, Division of Student Mental Health, at Queen’s University Kingston, said,

'Starting at university is a fascinating and important time. It’s a point of transition, not only from child to adult but from home to more independence. This research aims to collect reliable data from students over the course of their studies, to describe mental health factors that might lend themselves to suitable intervention, identify any barriers or gaps affecting the delivery of mental health care, and evaluate the link between mental health, access to care, and an individual’s academic performance.' 

The study will also identify any barriers and gaps that students experience if they access mental health care in Oxford.

The survey participants will be followed up over two years (where consent is given). The information provided will be used by the expert project team to develop services and support to help students flourish.

The survey will remain open for completion until 11 November 2020.

To find out more about U-Flourish

NIHR OXFORD HEALTH BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH CENTRE NEWS

Please follow the link below to read the news on the NIHR BRC website.

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