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The COVID-19 Supporting Parents, Adolescents, and Children in Epidemics (Co-SPACE) study materials have been shared with international collaborators in more than 15 countries. This new funding will support the development of further collaborations, enable work to bring together datasets and make the linked data open access, as well as help increase recruitment to the study, especially among harder to reach groups.

Young people sat in class holding the model of the brain, talking and smiling.

Dr Polly Waite, co-lead of the study, said, 

 

We are delighted to have been awarded funding from UKRI to support the Co-SPACE study and it's sister survey for parents/carers of pre-school children, Co-SPYCE. So far over 7,500 families have taken part. The findings will help us identify what protects children and young people from deteriorating mental health over time, what support families need and how this may vary according to different contexts.Dr Polly Waite.

 

The project is tracking children and young people’s mental health throughout the COVID-19 crisis through a monthly online survey by parents/carers of children aged 2-16 years and young people themselves (if aged 11-16 years).

Analysis of the data will be supported by the Oxford Brain Health Clinical Trials Unit. To develop a richer understanding of people's experiences, qualitative interviews will be conducted with parents/carers, young people and people who work with them. All of this will be done with rapid and meaningful engagement with families, children and young people, health professionals, charities and interested parties throughout. 

 

More information available on Supporting Parents, Adolescents and Children during Epidemics.

NIHR OXFORD HEALTH BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH CENTRE NEWS

Please follow the link below to read the news on the NIHR BRC website.

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