Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

The COVID-19 Supporting Parents, Adolescents, and Children in Epidemics (Co-SPACE) study materials have been shared with international collaborators in more than 15 countries. This new funding will support the development of further collaborations, enable work to bring together datasets and make the linked data open access, as well as help increase recruitment to the study, especially among harder to reach groups.

Young people sat in class holding the model of the brain, talking and smiling.

Dr Polly Waite, co-lead of the study, said, 

 

We are delighted to have been awarded funding from UKRI to support the Co-SPACE study and it's sister survey for parents/carers of pre-school children, Co-SPYCE. So far over 7,500 families have taken part. The findings will help us identify what protects children and young people from deteriorating mental health over time, what support families need and how this may vary according to different contexts.Dr Polly Waite.

 

The project is tracking children and young people’s mental health throughout the COVID-19 crisis through a monthly online survey by parents/carers of children aged 2-16 years and young people themselves (if aged 11-16 years).

Analysis of the data will be supported by the Oxford Brain Health Clinical Trials Unit. To develop a richer understanding of people's experiences, qualitative interviews will be conducted with parents/carers, young people and people who work with them. All of this will be done with rapid and meaningful engagement with families, children and young people, health professionals, charities and interested parties throughout. 

 

More information available on Supporting Parents, Adolescents and Children during Epidemics.

NIHR OXFORD HEALTH BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH CENTRE NEWS

Please follow the link below to read the news on the NIHR BRC website.

Similar stories

Oxfordshire Young People Involved in Childline Research Project

New research conducted by the Neuroscience, Ethics and Society group and NeurOX Young People’s Advisory Group in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Oxford, and the NSPCC, has looked at how Childline’s message boards help support young people.

28th British Isles Research Workshop on Suicide and Self-Harm & Lancet Psychiatry Suicide Symposium

This year's annual meeting focused again on research related to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on suicide and self-harm. There was another session on online safety in the context of suicidal behaviour and the Online Safety Bill. Organised by the Centre for Suicide Research, University of Oxford, these virtual workshops for both senior and early career researchers from the UK and Ireland provide an important opportunity to share knowledge and discuss the latest research. This year there were also contributions from Australia and Denmark.

Researchers Address Mental Health Effects of the Pandemic on Young People

In a new policy briefing, a team of researchers at King’s College London and Oxford University highlight the multiple effects that the COVID-19 pandemic has had on children and young people in the UK through their education and daily life, including challenges around social isolation, academic pressures, adjusting to online learning and coping with reopening of schools.

Simple Intervention Effectively Treats Depression During COVID 19

New research shows that even a very simple intervention, administered by non-specialists with just 15 hours of training, can effectively treat depression during COVID-19.

Over a Third of COVID-19 Patients Diagnosed with at Least One Long-COVID Symptom

A new study from the University of Oxford and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Oxford Health Biomedical Research Centre (BRC) investigated long-COVID in over 270,000 people recovering from COVID-19 infection, using data from the US-based TriNetX electronic health record network.